QuietMelodies is now open!

15 06 2009

through-open-doors

As many of you might already know, the new portal is finally open!!!!!  I am so sorry that it has taken so long to happen, but I do hope you find it worth the wait.  Some of the new features you will be able to enjoy are being able to message any member & being able to post your own favorites.  There will also be a forum added so that requests and such can be made there.  Eventually hope to in essence mirror this blog there and of course have new content available.  The new music available should be substantially more than here as there will be multiple people posting =-).  Please stop by and join your NEW home for QuietMusic – www.quietmelodies.com!

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Dead Can Dance – Within The Realm Of A Dying Sun

25 04 2009

000949f9Dead Can Dance – Within The Realm Of A Dying Sun
MP3 @ 320 Kbps | 38:48 min | 1987 | 118 MB | 10% Recovery Record

Lisa Gerrard and Brendan Perry actually manage to out-shimmer the Cocteau Twins on this 1987 release, which finds their beautiful minimalism adorned with increasingly developed compositional genius. The cascading melodies that grace “Summoning of the Muse” and “Persephone” are tailor-made for that next Christmas or Winter Solstice celebration, while more conventional (albeit somewhat somber) pop tracks like “Xavier” and “Anywhere Out of the World” keep the going from getting too arcane. All in all, more fun than a barrel of goths.

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Dead Can Dance – Toward The Within (Live)

25 04 2009

000949ffDead Can Dance – Toward The Within (Live)
MP3 @ 320 Kbps | 1:07:59 min | 1994 | 222 MB | 10% Recovery Record

Originally released in 1994, this record was an audio document of the band’s 1993 sell-out world tour. Recorded at the Mayfair Theater in Santa Monica, CA, in front of an invited audience at the conclusion of the tour, the shows were also filmed with the intent of releasing a long form concert film. Includes twelve previously unrecorded Dead Can Dance tracks as well as material from their six previous studio albums.  (For Monica =-))

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Dead Can Dance – The Serpent’s Egg

25 04 2009

000949faDead Can Dance – The Serpent’s Egg
MP3 @ 320 Kbps | 36:16 min | 1995 | 131 MB | 10% Recovery Record

The fourth Dead Can Dance album, THE SERPENT’S EGG, continues the band’s evolution away from tradition rock/pop song structures. The tracks are instead built on sustained chords, vocal harmonizing, and brittle-sounding string instruments. “Orbis de Ignis” is almost a cappella, the only music being a bell struck between verses, with the ethereal voice of Lisa Gerrard (and others) skittering over the surface. Along with the insistent tribal drumming of “Mother Tongue,” which eventually evolves into a wordless chant by Lisa Gerrard, the best tracks here are two featuring Brendan Perry’s vocals, “Severance” and “Ullyses.” The first opens on an ominous drone as the song’s narrative tells of a fading community (or civilization, even). The second features some of Perry’s most interesting work with the hurdy-gurdy, which is echoed by a string section. Also of note is the creepy vocal interplay in “Echolalia.” For fans of This Mortal Coil, “Song of Sophia” distinctly recalls that band’s “Song to the Siren.” This is maybe not the best Dead Can Dance record to begin with–it is certainly the group’s most insular–but for fans it is another fascinating trip to the dawn of Western music.  (For Monica =-))

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Dead Can Dance – Spleen And Ideal

25 04 2009

000949f7Dead Can Dance – Spleen And Ideal
MP3 @ 320 Kbps | 38:01 min | 1985 | 121 MB | 10% Recovery Record

The primarily experimental structure of their second album, released in 1986, dispelled any notion that the band deserved the post-Gothic label slapped on them by the music press. “Spleen And Ideal” defined a new richness of unification between voice and music, lyrics and structure. (For Monica =-))

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Dead Can Dance – Spiritchaser

25 04 2009

00094a00Dead Can Dance – Spiritchaser
MP3 @ 320 Kbps | 51:56 min | 1996 | 191 MB | 10% Recovery Record

Listening to Dead Can Dance is a transcendental experience. Enriched with dedications to the living Gaia, their creations subsist in natural and other worldly realms. Initially crafting songs which augmented their Australian roots with Gothic and Renaissance traditions, the group have since grown to encompass a hybrid of global sounds. On Spiritchaser the enchanted souls of founding members Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard shine in this, their most ethereal LP to date. Whereas earlier endeavors succumbed to genres grounded in eras of the past and non-Western present, it’s immediately apparent that this album has loftier aspirations. Hypnotically threaded with traditional and electronic instruments, the exorcism of each song touches upon the universal essence beyond. While Gerrard’s heavenly vocals are used primarily for instrumental effect, Perry’s fertile lyricism both compliments her efforts and expresses the spiritual associations related to the album’s title and meaning. Intrinsically delivered with shamanistic connectivity, the sensations ritualize the modern mortal. (For Monica =-))

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Dead Can Dance – Into The Labyrinth

25 04 2009

000949fdDead Can Dance – Into The Labyrinth
MP3 @ 320 Kbps | 1:05:31 min | 1993 | 236 MB | 10% Recovery Record

Their goth-sounding name and dour visual image aside, the prolific duo of Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard produce wildly eclectic but utterly unique music. Their painstakingly crafted albums encompass numerous arcane genres, from European classical music to ancient Celtic and Middle Eastern folk styles, often employing authentic antique instruments to achieve their ambitious, emotive soundscapes. The 1993 effort Into the Labyrinth found Dead Can Dance mixing their medieval leanings with more exotic Eastern influences on “Saldek” and “Yulunga,” while exploring Celtic balladry on the traditional “The Wind That Shakes the Barley” and theatrical songcraft in their interpretation of Bertolt Brecht’s “How Fortunate Is the Man with None.”  (For Monica =-))

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